Las consecuencias de la legalización a diferencia de la deportación masiva en Texas

Raúl Hinojosa-Ojeda, Center for American Progress, 8/30/2012:

Los debates sobre las ventajas económicas y fiscales y las desventajas de los inmigrantes suelen simplificar en exceso el papel que desempeñan los inmigrantes en nuestra economía. Cuando uno se fija más detenidamente, se dará cuenta que el impacto que los inmigrantes (o cualquier otro grupo de hecho) tienen en la economía es multifacético y complejo.

Los inmigrantes no son sólo trabajadores, sino que son también consumidores y contribuyentes que pagan impuestos. Los efectos de su trabajo y su consumo en el crecimiento económico y la salud fiscal se deben tomar en cuenta cuando se considera cómo abordar la situación de la fuerza laboral indocumentada.

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Public News Service: Reporte – Políticas de Inmigración probablemente influenciadas por motivos de ganancias

p>By Peter Malof/Naihma Deady, published July 26, 2012:

AUSTIN, Texas – En años recientes ha incrementado la aplicación de leyes migratorias, y el gobierno federal ha recurrido a instituciones privadas para la detención de inmigrantes indocumentados mientras esperan su fecha de audiencia ante la corte. Por esta razón el sector privado de instituciones de detención no fue afectado por la recesión económica. Un nuevo estudio de la organización Sentencing Project dice que en los últimos diez años el número promedio de inmigrantes detenidos en instituciones públicas incrementó 26%, mientas que el número de inmigrantes detenidos en instituciones privadas incrementó 188%.

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Huffington Post: New Data Indicates Mexican Migration Decline; A Separate Report Predicts Immigrant Integration

“At a time when statistics suggest that fewer Mexicans are setting out on the perilous journey across the border, a new study projects that newer immigrants, particularly Latinos, are expected to learn English, buy homes and acquire citizenship at high levels in the coming decades.

The data on declining immigration from Mexico along with the projections on integration patterns for newer immigrants appear at a particularly contentious moment in the national immigration debate, with many sectors calling for tighter border controls and more deportations.

The new report from the Center for American Progress, a nonpartisan think tank, offers a portrait of integration patterns that seem to counter the popular notion that Hispanic immigrants are not assimilating to life in the U.S.

The study tracked immigrants that arrived during the 1990s and found that while only 25.5 percent of them owned their home in 2000, 70.3 percent are projected to be homeowners by 2030.”  Read more …

Think Progress: Apple Crops In Washington At Risk Because Of Other States’ Extreme Immigration Laws

“Washington apple growers could have had one of the best apple harvests in the state’s history — if not for the lack of workers. Orchard owners say a federal immigration crackdown and extreme anti-immigrant laws in states like Alabama and Arizona have scared off many of their workers.

Some farmers have tried to hire domestic workers. Orchards have “pickers wanted” signs, and growers have asked neighbors for extra workers. But their efforts have been unsuccessful to replace the immigrant farm workers they typically hire. So just like farmers inAlabama and Georgia, their crops will go to waste without without the experienced workers to pick the apples by hand:” Read more …

Washington Post Editorial: How Alabama’s immigration law is crippling its farms

"FARMERS IN ALABAMA are in revolt against the state’s over-the-top immigration law, which is designed to hound illegal immigrants so that they move elsewhere. As it happens, a substantial portion of farm workers there, as in other states, are undocumented. In the farmers’ view, the law is depriving them of steady, experienced labor — and threatening to deal a lethal blow to crops throughout the state.

The uproar has exposed political fault lines within the Republican Party, whose vows of support for business have run headlong into its crusade to drive away illegal immigrants, on whom agribusiness relies. It’s also laying bare the nation’s hypocrisy over unskilled immigrants, whose legal entry into the country is blocked in most cases even though their labor remains much in demand." Read more…

 

Huffington Post Opinion: Different State, Same Hate

Department of Justice steps in to block South Carolina's anti-immigrant law

Elena Lacayo of the NCLR writes: "On Monday, the U.S. Department of Justice (DOJ) filed a lawsuit against South Carolina to block the implementation of SB 20, a divisive and dangerous anti-immigrant law signed by Gov. Nikki Haley (R-SC) earlier this year. If SB 20 does take effect on Jan. 1, 2012, the law will create a new $1.3 million immigration enforcement unit for South Carolina and provide local law enforcement with overly broad authority to investigate residents' immigration statuses. As NCLR (National Council of La Raza) has repeatedly pointed out in the past, when other states attempted to pass similar bills, these anti-immigrant laws not only promote racial profiling and discrimination, but also violate the Constitution."  Read more …

 

ABC: Immigrant Entrepreneur Gets Visa After ‘World News’ Story

"On Tuesday 'World News' shared the story of Amit Aharoni, an Israeli national and a graduate of Stanford Business School, who secured $1.65 million in venture capital funding with two cofounders to launchCruiseWise.com, an online cruise booking company.

The company hired nine Americans in just one year. But Aharoni hit rough waters after he received a letter on Oct. 4 from U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services denying his request for a visa and notifying him that he needed to leave the country immediately. Aharoni moved to Canada, where he was forced to run his company via Skype from a friend's living room."  Read more …

 

ABC News: Immigrant Creates U.S. Jobs, Gets Boot Over Visa

"Last year, Amit Aharoni, an Israeli national and a graduate of Stanford Business School, secured $1.65 million in venture capital funding with two cofounders to launch CruiseWise.com, an online cruise booking company.

Business Insider ranked the company, which is set to launch its website in just a few weeks, one of the '20 Hot Silicon Valley Startups You Need to Watch,' and Aharoni has already hired nine Americans.

But this story of entrepreneurship and job creation is hitting rough waters because Aharoni is not American. On Oct. 4, Aharoni received a letter from U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services denying his request for a visa and notifying him that he needed to leave the country immediately.

The government said Aharoni's job as CEO does not require someone with his high-level degree, even though he created the company."  Read more …

 

Chippewa Herald Opinion: Our economy relies on immigrants

Immigrants bring “new ideas, new perspectives and new talent to our workforce. To reverse the decades-long trend of economic decline in this city, we need to think globally.”

Those are the comments of Dayton, Ohio Mayor Gary Leitzell explaining why his city has adopted a plan encouraging immigrants to come to the city to help pull it out of its economic tailspin.

Dayton has lost thousands of jobs and 15 percent of its population. It hopes immigrant entrepreneurs will help rebuild and grow the city’s small business and restore the city’s neighborhoods.

Dayton’s viewpoint on immigration is countered by states like Alabama, where a new law allows police to detain indefinitely anyone suspected of being in the state illegally and requires schools to check the status of new students.  Read more …