Public News Service: Debate en los medios – mas informativos evitan decir “inmigrantes ilegales”

By Peter Malof, published October 17, 2012:

SAN ANTONIO, Texas – Los cambios demográficos, junto con nuevas políticas de inmigración, alimentan los debates recientes en los círculos mediáticos sobre cómo referirse a los inmigrantes que no vinieron a los Estados Unidos por medios legales. La diferencia no estriba en que sea un adjetivo o un adverbio, sino en el uso que se da a la palabra “ilegal” cuando se refiere a residentes que no se mudaron a este país con la documentación adecuada.

Desde la cadena CNN hasta el Huffington Post, los principales informativos han tratado de aumentar su público latino evitando el término “inmigrante ilegal”. Un ejemplo es el San Antonio Express-News, con distribución incluso en México, el cual hace dos años decidió que el término no era consistente con la forma en que el periódico describe a otros supuestos infractores de la ley. Jamie Stockwell, editora en jefe del periódico, dice que es como llamarle “conductor ilegal” a quien viola las leyes de tránsito.

“Entonces, la forma correcta de describir el estatus migratorio de una persona –cuando la información es relevante– es decir que esa persona está en el país ilegalmente. Y luego citamos la fuente de información. Por ejemplo, ‘La policía dice que el hombre está ilegalmente en los Estados Unidos.”

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al.com: Alabama immigration law has denied basic human rights, report says

BIRMINGHAM, Alabama — Alabama’s immigration law has led to illegal immigrants around the state having their basic rights denied and should be repealed, a human rights group contends in a report being issued today.

“The initial human impact has been devastating, though the full consequences remain unknown,” stated the report, “No Way To Live: Alabama’s Immigrant Law,” issued by Human Rights Watch.

“A group of people have found themselves unable to live the lives they had lived for many years. Some were barred from access to basic services like water, and many more were told they could not live in homes they own,” according to the report. Read More …

Boston Globe/AP: NY immigrant advocates criticize Border Patrol

“BUFFALO, N.Y.—Immigrant rights advocates and the New York Civil Liberties Union on Wednesday accused the Border Patrol in upstate New York of abusing its authority by questioning the citizenship of train and bus passengers, as well as people going about their business in towns miles away from any international crossing.

A report based on a Freedom of Information request suggests agents charged with securing the U.S.-Canadian border have taken advantage of their 100-mile area of jurisdiction to snare and deport illegal immigrants who have been in the country for years, using police-state tactics that allow them to boost arrest rates and justify increased funding.” Read more …

Think Progress: Apple Crops In Washington At Risk Because Of Other States’ Extreme Immigration Laws

“Washington apple growers could have had one of the best apple harvests in the state’s history — if not for the lack of workers. Orchard owners say a federal immigration crackdown and extreme anti-immigrant laws in states like Alabama and Arizona have scared off many of their workers.

Some farmers have tried to hire domestic workers. Orchards have “pickers wanted” signs, and growers have asked neighbors for extra workers. But their efforts have been unsuccessful to replace the immigrant farm workers they typically hire. So just like farmers inAlabama and Georgia, their crops will go to waste without without the experienced workers to pick the apples by hand:” Read more …

The Georgia Bulletin: Church’s role in helping immigrants indispensable, says Texas bishop

"SAN ANTONIO (CNS) — A Catholic bishop told a San Antonio audience that 'as a leaven in the wider community of peoples' and the bearer 'of conscience and of hope,' the church must work in favor of the immigrant, preach the Gospel and focus on the youths. After outlining the changing dynamics of immigration and violence and addressing some of the effects on the local communities, Bishop Daniel E. Flores of Brownsville offered his 'pastoral perspective and some thoughts about the indispensable role of the church in facing the current reality on the border.'" Read more …

Washington Post Editorial: How Alabama’s immigration law is crippling its farms

"FARMERS IN ALABAMA are in revolt against the state’s over-the-top immigration law, which is designed to hound illegal immigrants so that they move elsewhere. As it happens, a substantial portion of farm workers there, as in other states, are undocumented. In the farmers’ view, the law is depriving them of steady, experienced labor — and threatening to deal a lethal blow to crops throughout the state.

The uproar has exposed political fault lines within the Republican Party, whose vows of support for business have run headlong into its crusade to drive away illegal immigrants, on whom agribusiness relies. It’s also laying bare the nation’s hypocrisy over unskilled immigrants, whose legal entry into the country is blocked in most cases even though their labor remains much in demand." Read more…

 

Gotham Gazette: Bill Curtails City Role in Deportations

"With states such as Arizona and Alabama passing immigration laws that go far beyond those of the federal government, the New York City Council weighed in on the issue yesterday and took a decidedly different stand.

By an overwhelming majority, the council passed a bill sponsored by Melissa Mark-Viveritoof Manhattan that would end the Department of Correction's policy of cooperating with federal efforts to deport undocumented immigrants. The bill, said by supporters to be the first of its kind in the country, will end two decades of cooperation between the city jail system and federal immigration authorities, now called Immigration and Customs Enforcement, or ICE.

This bill, Intro 656, Mark-Viverito said shortly before its passage, 'sends a strong message we will no longer be complicit in this country's broken immigration system.'

City Council Speaker Christine Quinn cited another message as well. 'When signed by the mayor,' she said, 'the entire government of New York will send a message the city of New York is supportive of, friendly to and welcoming to immigrants.'"  Read more.

 

AP: Perry endorses work visas for illegal immigrants

"AUSTIN, Texas (AP) — Texas Gov. Rick Perry proposed the federal government should extend work visas allowing illegal immigrants to move freely between the U.S. and their home countries — but stressed that he opposes amnesty or a path to citizenship.

Perry said in an interview with CNN's John King on Thursday that expectations that U.S. authorities are going to arrest and deport up to 15 million illegal immigrants isn't realistic. He added, however, that other Republicans, including fellow Texan George W. Bush, went too far when they previously proposed an immigration overhaul that included a path to citizenship.

The Texas governor also claimed his chief rival for the Republican presidential nomination, Mitt Romney, had once supported amnesty. Romney has drawn criticism for hiring a lawn care company that employed illegal immigrants at his family's property in a Boston suburb for a decade — but has also said amnesty is not appropriate for illegal immigrants."  Read more …

Washington Post/AP: Mexican soldiers rescue 15 Honduran migrants being held for ransom in northern border city

"MEXICO CITY — Mexico’s Defense Department says soldiers have rescued 15 Honduran migrants who had been kidnapped and were being held in a house in Nuevo Laredo on the border with the United States.

The military says troops patroling in the Privada Esmeralda neighborhood on Monday detained a man who was watching over the migrants.

A statement Wednesday gives no other details of the rescue in Nuevo Laredo, which is across the border from Laredo, Texas.

Soldiers and federal police have been increasingly rescuing migrants kidnapped by drug cartels. Authorities say migrants are kidnapped for ransom or to be forced to work for the crime syndicates."  Link to story.